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Qigong

Qigong Forest is dedicated to B. P. Chan, my friend and instructor for more than 25 years. I will be quoting him extensively and explaining the training methods he has shared with me. The most important aspects of this training are the principles, which prepare the body for self-healing through Qigong. Mr. Chan always said, “Love the […]

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Interview with Wu-Ming

Jeff Bartfeld interviews Wu-Ming on a variety of subjects including: 1.  What does one need to cultivate Qi? 2. What is Jing, Qi and Shen? 3. How do you cultivate Qi? 4. How does Qigong cure illness? 5. Why do many people who practice meditative arts, which are ostensibly good for health, still wind up […]

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By invitation only: A unique training opportunity

Twice in my life, I’ve had the great good fortune to meet a teacher who possessed a treasure trove of rare traditional knowledge and who was willing to share as much of it with me  as I could absorb. I guess good luck runs in threes because it’s happened again. And not only has the man […]

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Less is more – Episode 2

It’s easy to get caught up in various forms and indeed Hsing I, Tai Chi, Bagua and other arts and Qigong practices are fascinating, but as in all things, “the devil is in the details.” The process of learning the internal arts is a lot like the process of cleaning out your basement or garage. […]

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Re-inhabit your body

A student of Mr. Chan who studied with him very briefly in the 1980s told me this story: “One day, Mr. Chan held his forearm up and asked “Who’s arm is this? This is *my* arm.” I had no idea what he was talking about, but I knew that HE knew what he was talking […]

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The Secret of Qigong

The secret of Qigong is standing meditation. It is the way to mind-body transformation and requires the same principles that should be taught in all forms of meditation. Unfortunately this is not the case. Take for example traditional meditation, where the student is told to sit with the back or spine straight, without a description […]

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Less is more – Episode 1

“Less is more.” That’s something we can profitably tell ourselves every day, all day, especially when practicing Qigong. Here’s just one application of the idea. There are many, many forms of Qigong, many series to learn, and many internal arts based on Qigong principles like Tai Chi, Hsing I and Bagua. However, at the end […]

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What we teach

Traditional Qigong focuses on: 1. The breath 2. Standing 3. Walking While it’s true that are many worthwhile, helpful and interesting forms and systems you can learn, these are the fundamentals of all practice. These alone – without any other practice whatsoever – will absolutely transform your life in ways you can’t even imagine. They […]

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Strict and loose, loose and strict

Mr. Chan use to say: “Love the principles more than your teacher.” When it comes to principles, there is no room for discussion or variation. That’s the “strict” part of Qigong. However, as much as you strive to improve your form so that it corresponds to the principles, inside you want to continuously loosen, loosen, […]

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Are you asking questions?

Progress comes from questions and questions come from practice. One of the benefits of regular, daily practice is that you will become a lot more involved in the details of your Qigong education. Instead of “going through the motions” or playing “follow the leader” in class, you’ll naturally become curious about the specifics of particular […]

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Disconnect to reconnect

The world is not designed to “drive you sane” or make you healthy. It’s certainly not the case now and it probably never was. A huge part of Qigong practice is developing a quiet mind, one that is not buffeted by the daily pressures of so-called normal life. How do you attain this? The Tao […]

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